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lawlibrary Maryland Law

The 2016 Edition of Michie’s Maryland Court Rules is available!

The 2016 Edition of Michie’s Maryland Court Rules is available at the Law Library!  The 2016 edition includes amendments adopted through October 20, 2015 and supersedes and replaces all previous editions and supplements.  The Maryland Rules are the rules of practice and procedure followed by Maryland courts and apply to all Maryland courts, unless noted otherwise.  Michie’s Maryland Rules are annotated, meaning that there are explanatory notes and comments added to the rules by the publisher’s editorial staff. Annotation sources include Maryland case law, the Maryland Law Review, the University of Baltimore Law Review, the University of Baltimore Law Forum and Opinions of the Attorney General.

If you are new to the Maryland Rules, the People’s Law Library has an online video tutorial on reading the Maryland Rules through Westlaw, which is available at http://www.screencast.com/t/My0FU44NZbwL.

Can I access the rules online? Yes, the current Maryland Code and Rules (without annotations) are available online, free of charge, through LexisNexis and Westlaw.  In addition, you can access the Law Library’s online subscriptions to LexisNexis and WestlawNext in-person at the library.

What about the superseded Maryland rules? The Law Library maintains copies of the superseded Maryland Rules from 1980 to the present in its collection. If you need to reference the superseded Maryland Rules, please drop by the Law Library’s service desk, and we can assist you in locating the appropriate resources.

Categories
lawlibrary Legal Technology

Online Databases in the Limelight – Verdict Search*

Online databases can be invaluable, time-saving  tools to any legal researcher as they provide organized access to a wide array of legal resources as well as sophisticated search tools.  Many online databases, including fee-based databases, are available at the Law Library, free of charge, to library patrons.  This month, the blog will feature six of the online databases available at the Law Library.

Are you looking for assistance with case valuation (i.e., what is the amount of money that you can reasonably expect in damages)?  Then look no further because the Law Library subscribes to VerdictSearch, an online database for verdict and settlement research.  VerdictSearch at the Law Library provides users with access to federal and state cases from Maryland, Virginia and Washington D.C. Search results may assist you with your trial research and strategy development.

How do I search on VerdictSearch? You can search by keywords (e.g., “car accident”) and then use any of the following filters:

  • Type of Injury (e.g., back, neck, head)
  • Venue (state and/or federal)
  • Case type (e.g., motor vehicle, insurance, wrongful death)
  • Award Type (e.g., verdict-plaintiff, settlement, mediated settlement)
  • Date Range (any range from 1988 to 2015)
  • Award Amount (e.g., less than $10,000, $10,000 to $100,000)

You can further refine their searches by plaintiff type (e.g., age, gender), expert name, attorney name, judge name, and insurance carrier. Once you have your results, VerdictSearch’s document delivery includes printing and email (PDF and Word).

Can I access VerdictSearch at the Library? Yes! The Law Library offers FREE, in-person access to VerdictSearch on a designated computer in our computer room. Please come to the service desk to request assistance in accessing VerdictSearch.

What to do if you need help with VerdictSearch? Please ask for help at the Law Library’s service desk. We can provide technical and research assistance.

Can I access the Law Library’s VerdictSearch subscription from home? No. The Law Library’s current subscription permits in-person use at the library only.

*This blog post is an update of a blog post previously published on December 22, 2014.

Categories
lawlibrary Legal Technology Self Represented

Online Databases in the Limelight – NOLO

Online databases can be invaluable, time-saving  tools to any legal researcher as they provide organized access to a wide array of legal resources as well as sophisticated search tools.  Many online databases, including fee-based databases, are available at the Law Library, free of charge, to library patrons.  This month, the blog will feature six of the online databases available at the Law Library.

NOLO publishes do-it-yourself manuals, a lawyer directory and form books in print and electronic formats all written in plain English, meaning that you do not need a legal background to understand the text. For legal research, NOLO’s materials can be a great starting point to get a general understanding of the law in a specific subject. Through the library’s online subscription, you have access NOLO’s publications, which include titles on topics such as auto accidents, bankruptcy, business law, criminal law, debt management, disability law, LGBT law, medical malpractice, real estate, small businesses, workers’ compensation and much more! You can search for specific keywords or browse titles. However, NOLO does not provide legal advice, and you should not consider these materials as a substitute for legal advice from an attorney.

Can I access NOLO at the Library? Yes! The Law Library offers FREE, in-person access to the NOLO database.

How to use NOLO in the Library? You can access NOLO from any of the public access computers available at the Law Library.

What to do if you need help with NOLO? Please ask for help at the Law Library’s service desk. We can provide technical and research assistance.

Can I access the Law Library’s NOLO subscription from home? No. The Law Library’s current subscription permits in-person use at the library only. However, NOLO offers many free articles on topics like accidents, bankruptcy, immigration, taxes, wills, and much more. You can access this free information at www.nolo.com.

Do you prefer print resources? Then check out the Law Library’s print collection of NOLO titles, which includes the following:

  • NOLO’s Encyclopedia of Everyday Law (SELF HELP KF387 .N65 2014);
  • NOLO’s Essential Guide to Divorce (SELF HELP KF535 .D67 2014);
  • NOLO’s Guide to Social Security Disability (SELF HELP KF3649 .M6 2014);
  • Patent, Copyright & Trademark (SELF HELP KF2980 .E44 2014);
  • Contracts: The Essential Business Desk Reference (SELF HELP KF801 .S75 2011);
  • Neighbor Law: Fences, Trees, Boundaries & Noise (SELF HELP KF639 .J67 2014);
  • Plus many more!

For more information about understanding legal research, including the difference between primary and secondary legal resources, check out these research guides.

Categories
lawlibrary

Online Databases in the Limelight – Bloomberg BNA*

Online databases can be invaluable, time-saving  tools to any legal researcher as they provide organized access to a wide array of legal resources as well as sophisticated search tools.  Many online databases, including fee-based databases, are available at the Law Library, free of charge, to library patrons.  This month, the blog will feature six of the online databases available at the Law Library.

The Law Library provides library patrons with free access to the Bloomberg BNA (Bureau of National Affairs) legal database.  While there is a great deal of overlap between the resources available on Bloomberg BNA and WestlawNext and LexisNexis, which we highlighted earlier this month, Bloomberg BNA materials are only available on Bloomberg BNA.  These BNA materials include the following.

  • United States Law Week provides searchable access to Supreme Court opinions, Supreme Court Practice and Federal Appellate Practice.
  • Family Law Reporter provides a weekly roundup of family law developments and trends.
  • Criminal Law Reporter provides an overview of trends, development and issues in criminal law.
  • Lawyer’s Manual on Professional Conduct provides news and guidance regarding attorneys’ ethics and professional conduct.
  • “Slices” of Labor and Employment Law: The Americans with Disabilities Act Manual, which provides news and guidance related to ADA issues, developments, and state law compliance, and the Employment Discrimination Report, which covers developments in the procedural and substantive aspects of employment discrimination law, are the two resources the library has available through this database.

Can I access Bloomberg BNA at the Library? Yes! The Law Library offers FREE, in-person access to Bloomberg BNA.

How to use Bloomberg BNA in the Library? You can access Bloomberg BNA from any of the public access computers available at the Law Library.

What to do if you need help with Bloomberg BNA? Please ask for help at the Law Library’s service desk. We can provide technical and research assistance.

Can I access the Law Library’s Bloomberg BNA subscription from home? No. The Law Library’s current subscription permits in-person use at the library only.

For more information about understanding legal research, including the difference between primary and secondary legal resources, check out these research guides.

*This blog post is an update of a blog post previously published on December 30, 2014.

Categories
lawlibrary Legal Technology

Online Databases in the Limelight – HeinOnline*

Online databases can be invaluable, time-saving  tools to any legal researcher as they provide organized access to a wide array of legal resources as well as sophisticated search tools.  Many online databases, including fee-based databases, are available at the Law Library, free of charge, to library patrons.  This month, the blog will feature six of the online databases available at the Law Library.

Do you want what’s on the computer screen to match what was printed? Are you interested in accessing historical articles? If so, then HeinOnline may be the online database service for you! Launched in 2000, HeinOnline is the largest, image-based legal research database with full-text and page images of law review articles, treatises and primary sources of law.  HeinOnline users can search for specific resources or browse one of the database’s many collections.  For example, you can browse the Law Journal Library collection and see a listing of a specific Law Review’s articles, organized chronologically. Or, if you are interested in railroad case law from the 1800s, you can search HeinOnline’s Early American Case Law collection.

In addition, the Law Library’s subscription now includes the ABA Law LIbrary Collection Periodicals! Through this database, library users have digital access to 98 ABA titles, including ABA Journal, ABA Journal of Labor & Employment Law, Family Law Litigation, Mass Torts Litigants, Products Liability, and Trial Practice. A complete list of publications is available here.

Why use HeinOnline? Can’t I access the same information through LexisNexis or WestlawNext? Yes, there is overlap between the resources available on HeinOnline and the resources available on the WestlawNext and Lexis.  However, there are two big reasons why you may prefer to use HeinOnline over WestlawNext and LexisNexis.  First, HeinOnline is an image-based database. This means that you can see page images of documents, including graphics, which match the print versions of the resources.  Second, HeinOnline has a greater focus on retrospective historical coverage, meaning that you can find older documents that may be unavailable in the other databases.  

Can I access HeinOnline at the Library? Yes! The Law Library offers FREE, in-person access to HeinOnline.

How to use HeinOnline in the Library? You can access HeinOnline from any of the public access computers available at the Law Library.

What to do if you need help with HeinOnline? Please ask for help at the Law Library’s service desk. We can provide technical and research assistance.

Can I access the Law Library’s HeinOnline subscription from home? No. The Law Library’s current subscription permits in-person use in the courthouse only.

For more information about understanding legal research, including the difference between primary and secondary legal resources, check out these research guides.

*This blog post is an update of a blog post previously published on December 9, 2014.

Categories
lawlibrary Legal Technology

Online Databases in the Limelight – LexisNexis*

IMG_1894
Here is one of the computers in the Law Library with access to LexisNexis.

Online databases can be invaluable, time-saving  tools to any legal researcher as they provide organized access to a wide array of legal resources as well as sophisticated search tools.  Many online databases, including fee-based databases, are available at the Law Library, free of charge, to library patrons.  This month, the blog will feature six of the online databases available at the Law Library.

Lexis is one of the biggest players in the world of legal publishing and online legal research.  Lexis offers LexisNexis, a platform for searchable databases with access to a wide array of primary resources, such as federal and state statutes, federal and state regulations and case law, as well as secondary resources, such as encyclopedias, treatises, journal articles and form books.*  

There is a myriad of tools, resources and services available through Lexis.  Some of the most popular secondary Maryland resources available through our LexisNexis subscription are Pleading Causes of Action in Maryland  and MICPEL’s Marital Settlement Agreement Form. In addition, LexisNexis provides Shepard’s Case Citations, which identifies all published cases and other sources that cite (e.g., refer to) the case being reviewed by the legal researcher and provides additional information, such as the reason why the later case cited the case at hand.  This is important information to have as later cases can affect the value of the case at hand or later cases may better address the matter being researched.  In addition, the Law Library’s subscription includes document delivery services (e.g., email, print, PDF downloads, RTF downloads) so that users can access certain resources after the online session has concluded.

Can I access LexisNexis at the Library? Yes! The Law Library offers FREE, in-person access to LexisNexis. As access to LexisNexis can be cost-prohibitive to attorneys and self-represented litigants, the Law Library provides free access to meet its users’ legal research needs.

How to use LexisNexis in the Library? There are three computers designated for public LexisNexis access in the law library. Each computer has a small sign indicating the availability of LexisNexis. You do not need log-in information — simply double-click on the LexisNexis icon on the computer’s desktop.

What to do if you need help with LexisNexis? Please ask for help at the Law Library’s service desk. We can provide technical assistance (e.g.,  how to get started, how to use and search the database) as well as research assistance (e.g.,  how best to formulate your search, which resources to target for more refined searches).

Can I access the Law Library’s LexisNexis subscription from home? No. The Law Library’s current subscription permits in-person use at the library only.

*This blog post is an update of a blog post previously published on December 2, 2014.

**For more information about understanding legal research, including the difference between primary and secondary legal resources, check out these research guides.

Categories
lawlibrary Legal Technology

Online Databases in the Limelight – WestlawNext*

IMG_1889
Here’s a snapshot of one of the computers in our computer room with WestlawNext access.

Online databases can be invaluable, time-saving  tools to any legal researcher as they provide organized access to a wide array of legal resources as well as sophisticated search tools.  Many online databases, including fee-based databases, are available at the Law Library, free of charge, to library patrons.  This month, the blog will feature six of the online databases available at the Law Library.

Thomson Reuters is one of the biggest players in the world of legal publishing and online legal research and is the publisher of WestlawNext, a platform for searchable databases with access to a wide array of primary resources, such as federal and state statutes, federal and state regulations and case law, as well as secondary resources, such as encyclopedias, treatises, journal articles and form books.**

There is a myriad of tools, resources and services available through both WestlawNext.  One of the most popular services provided through WestlawNext is KeyCite, which is an online case citator service. KeyCite identifies all published cases and other sources that cite (e.g., refer to) the case being reviewed by the legal researcher and provide additional information, such as the reason why the later case cited the case at hand.  This is important information to have as later cases can affect the value of the case at hand or later cases may better address the matter being researched.  In addition, document delivery services (e.g., email, print, PDF downloads, RTF downloads) are available through the Law Library’s WestlawNext subscription. This means that users can access certain resources after the online session has concluded.

Can I access WestlawNext at the Library? Yes! The Law Library offers FREE, in-person access to WestlawNext. As access to WestlawNext can be cost-prohibitive to attorneys and self-represented litigants, the Law Library provides free access to meet its users’ legal research needs.

How to use WestlawNext in the Library? There are two computers designated for public WestlawNext access in the law library. Each computer has a small sign indicating the availability of WestlawNext. You do not need log-in information — simply double-click on the WestlawNext icon on the computer’s desktop.

What to do if you need help with WestlawNext? Please ask for help at the Law Library’s service desk. We can provide technical assistance (e.g.,  how to get started, how to use and search the database) as well as research assistance (e.g.,  how best to formulate your search, which resources to target for more refined searches).

Can I access the Law Library’s WestlawNext subscription from home? No. The Law Library’s current subscription permits in-person use at the library only.

*This blog post is an update of a blog post previously published on December 2, 2014.

**For more information about understanding legal research, including the difference between primary and secondary legal resources, check out these research guides.

Categories
lawlibrary Pro Bono Self Represented

Protective Order versus Peace Order?

A common confusion for law library users is the difference between a protective order and a peace order. Essentially, whether you should be pursuing a protective order or a peace order will depend on your answer to two questions: (1) what is the relationship between you and the alleged abuser (for example, spouse, caretaker) and (2) what type of abuse you are claiming has happened. The Maryland Courts website provides a great overview of the differences between a protective order and a peace order, as well as helpful information regarding how to file for a protective or peace order.

Do you need help with filing your protective order or peace order? If so, the Maryland Courts Self-Help Centerthe District Court Self-Help Resource Center and the Annapolis YWCA can help.

Maryland Courts Self-Help Center
Monday-Friday, 8:30 AM – 8:000 PM
ONLINE CHAT
District Court Self-Help Resource Center
Monday-Friday, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
ONLINE CHAT
Annapolis YWCA Domestic Violence Hotline
24 Hour-Hotline 410-2226800

How do you keep the public from seeing information about you related to the protective or peace order? Check out these brochures for the petitioner (alleged victim) and respondents (alleged abuser).
For more information, please contact the Law Library! We can assist you in identifying self-help centers and other resources that may be able to assist you. In addition, we can show you how to access the court forms online.

Categories
lawlibrary Maryland Law Pro Bono Self Represented

Marital Settlement Agreement

Thanks to a change in Maryland law that went into effect last month, the Law Library has experienced a notable increase in the number of people requesting assistance with marital settlement agreements. The change in Maryland Law provides for an absolute divorce on the grounds of mutual consent if certain conditions are met. One of these conditions is the submission of a written settlement agreement that resolves all of the issues relating to alimony and the distribution of property.

What is a marital settlement agreement? A marital settlement agreement, also commonly referred to as a separation agreement or a property settlement agreement, is a written document that is a binding contract between a married couple in preparation for divorce, that they enter into voluntarily in order to address the division of their property, alimony and other relevant topics.

For background information, including negotiating and enforcing a marital settlement agreement, check out this article on the People’s Law Library.

Do you need to find a sample agreement? The Law Library can assist with you with locating samples that you can use as a starting point for drafting your marital settlement agreement. Please note, however, that the library cannot advise you as to what you should or should not include in your settlement agreement.

Do you need help with your marital settlement agreement? The Maryland Courts Self-Help Center (Phone: 410-260-1392) and the Family Law Self-Help Center (Phone: 410-280-5374) may be able to help. Please remember that the self-help centers can only provide limited legal assistance, so they may not be able to review your agreement in its entirety.

For more information, please contact the Law Library!

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lawlibrary Pro Bono Self Represented

Family Law Resources for Self-Represented Litigants at the Law Library


Questions related to family law matters, such as custody, child support, divorce and visitation, are the library’s most frequently asked questions. Here is a quick rundown of available resources and referrals. If you want to learn more or can’t find what you’re looking for, please
contact us!

 

Are you looking for background and general information? If so, check out these sites.

In addition, the Library carries the following print materials, which may assist you.

  • Maryland Family Law, 5th \ Fader (KFM 1294.F33 2011)
  • Maryland Divorce and Separation Law, 9th \ Thomas (KFM 1300.M37 2009)
  • Maryland Domestic Relations Forms \ Turnbull (KFM 1294A65 T38)
  • Maryland Law Encyclopedia – Children, Custody and Support, Divorce, Husband and Wife, Parent and Child
  • Maryland Digest – Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce, Husband and Wife, Parent and Child

 

Are you interested in the Maryland Code and Rules of Procedure? For the Maryland Code, the Family Law Article contains much of the law regarding divorce, custody, child support, etc. You can access them in print as well as online in the Law Library. If you want to access these resources from home, check out these links.

 

Do you need to conduct case law research? The Law Library has both online and print sources to assist you. Online sources include LexisNexis and WestlawNext. Don’t know how to use these online databases? We can show you how! (If you don’t know what case law research is, check out this article – http://peoples-law.org/understanding-legal-research) If you want to conduct case law research from home, here are some options.

 

Do you want assistance with your family law matter? These organizations provide limited legal assistance.

FLSHCThe Family Law Self-Help Center is located in the back of the Law Library; provides legal information and forms to assist unrepresented litigants in matters of divorce, custody/visitation, child support and name changes.
WALK-IN HOURS:

Monday, Wednesday and Thursday: 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Friday:  9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
TELEPHONE HOURS (410-280-5374):
Monday through Friday:  9:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m.

Women’s Law Center
Family Law Hotline 1-800-845-8550 M- F 9:30 am – 4:30 pm.
Family Law Forms Helpline operates at 1-800-818-9888 Tu, W & F 9:00 am – 12:30 pm, Th 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.
Spanish-1-877-293-2507 (leave message)

 

Are you looking for attorney to represent you in your family law matter? These organizations may be able to assist you.

Legal Aid Bureau
General Civil Legal Services
Income eligibility screening required
Regional Office 410-972-2700
M-F 9:00 AM-5:00 PM.

Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service
General Legal Services
Income eligibility screening required
410-547-6537 or 800-510-0050
M-TH 9:00AM-1:00PM.

Lawyer Referral Service (Anne Arundel County)
410-280-6961
All civil and criminal cases with no eligibility screening.
Fees set by attorney
M-F 8:45 AM – 2:15 PM

 

Are you looking for domestic violence assistance? These organizations may be able to assist you.

House of Ruth Domestic Violence Legal Clinic
24 Hour Hotline for Domestic Violence Victims
888-880-7884

YWCA of Annapolis and Anne Arundel County
Domestic Violence Assistance.
Legal Services Intake 24 Hour Voicemail
410-222-6800